World Bank to show how Africa’s electricity providers can be profitable and still make electricity affordable at African Utility Week in Cape Town

0
145

African Utility Week to gather 7000+ power professionals in Cape Town Photo: Spintelligent

A new World Bank study presents a sobering assessment of the financial health of electricity utilities in Sub-Saharan Africa, and suggests how utilities can be profitable while extending affordable services for the poor.

“A central but under-reported issue on the movement to reach universal access is the financial health of electricity utilities. Less than half of utilities cover operating expenditures while several countries lose in excess of US$0.25 per kWh sold. In this context, it will be difficult for utilities to maintain existing assets, let alone facilitate the expansion needed to reach universal access goals,” said Lucio Monari, Director, Energy and Extractive Global Practice at the World Bank. Mr Monari will address the Utility CEO Forum at the upcoming African Utility Week in Cape Town from 16-18 May and present results of a recent World Bank study: “Making Power Affordable for Africa and Viable for Its Utilities”.

The study looked at utility financial statements and power tariffs in more than 40 countries, and spending data in household surveys for 22 countries. “It remains surprisingly difficult to get basic bread-and-butter data such as tariff schedules, operational performance data, and financial statements. We focused heavily on raw data collection directly from Sub-Saharan utilities. This study’s strength is that it distils lessons from dozens of countries. We hope it will help make Africa’s power sector financially sustainable and advance the goal of universal access to electricity,” Mr Monari explained.

Key messages from the report suggest several ways of recovering the cost of supply and making electricity affordable:

  • One third of countries may become financially viable through improving operational efficiency.
  • It is almost certain that increasing tariffs will be needed in the remaining two-thirds of the countries studied.
  • Individual meters in poor households can help utilities target cross-subsidies better.
  • Installing prepaid meters would benefit both utilities and customers.
  • The first priority in increasing access to electricity is to make the initial connection affordable to the poor.

Increasing potential of mini and off-grid

Mr. Monari is a featured speaker at African Utility Week and the Energy Revolution Africa conference and exhibition in Cape Town from 16-18 May. He says: “To make the power sector more viable, sector governance and utility management need to be strengthened. The regulatory framework should be clear and predictable, providing incentives for the utility to improve their performance. Privatization and unbundling can work where the conditions are right. Unbundling does have transaction costs that need to be considered and weighed carefully against the benefits of creating new institutions.”

The World Bank study focused primarily on grid electricity, says Mr Monari, adding: “while connecting to the grid is a solution for urban Africans and many people living in rural areas, rural electrification cannot rely solely or even largely on grid extension. Mini and off-grid electricity, especially from sources like solar, offers increasing potential to electrify homes in many rural areas of Sub-Saharan Africa.”

Eskom performs well, but low tariffs highlighted

The study states that South Africa has the most developed and complex electricity sector in Sub-Saharan Africa and that its installed capacity alone is equivalent to the rest of the continent. Eskom also seemed to be one of the best performing utilities in the region with regards to technical and non-technical losses. However, the report identified low tariff levels as a major issue. Says Mr Monari: “as Eskom moves away from aged coal plants to modernize its generation fleet, prices will likely need to increase to cover the investment costs for capacity rehabilitation and expansion, or else the utility will continue to pose a fiscal burden to the government.”

The full interview with Lucio Monari and the World Bank study is available on the event website.

Real world doers share their expertise

The 17th annual African Utility Week is the leading conference and trade exhibition for African power, energy and water professionals who will have the opportunity to meet over 300 suppliers of services and technology to the industry.

Energy Revolution Africa will provide a unique forum for solution providers to meet with the new energy purchasers such as metros and municipalities, IPPs, rural electrification project developers and large power users, including mines, commercial property developers and industrial manufacturers. The latest innovations and projects in the sectors of renewables, future technology, energy efficiency, micro/off-grid and energy storage will be showcased.

Industry support

Apart from KPMG’s diamond sponsorship, industry stalwarts EPG, GE, Huawei, Landis+Gyr, Lucy Electric, Ontec and Shell are platinum sponsors while Aberdare Cables, Conlog, Oracle Utilities, SAP, SBS Tanks and Vodacom have already confirmed their gold sponsorships.

African Utility Week and Energy Revolution Africa is the flagship energy event organised by the multi-award winning Spintelligent, leading Cape Town-based trade exhibition and conference organiser, and part of Clarion Events Ltd, based in the UK. Other well-known energy events by Spintelligent are Future Energy Nigeria (formerly known as WAPIC), Future Energy East Africa (formerly EAPIC), Future Energy Uganda and Future Energy Central Africa. Other industry-leading events organised by Spintelligent are DRC Mining Week, Kenya Mining Week, Nigeria Mining Week, Agritech Expo Zambia, Property Buyer Show, African Real Estate & Infrastructure Summit and Eduweek.

Earlier this year, Spintelligent won four major awards at the ROAR Organiser and Exhibitor Awards, which honour excellence in the exhibition and events industry on the continent and were organised by the Association of African Exhibition Organisers (AAXO). African Utility Week won for Best Trade Exhibition 6001-12000 sqm category, (joint winners with the World Travel Market).

Dates for African Utility Week and Energy Revolution Africa:
Conference and expo: 16-18 May 2017
Awards gala dinner: 17 May 2016
Site visits: 19 May 2016
Location: CTICC, Cape Town, South Africa

SHARE
Previous articleMore Brands Should Reveal Where Their Clothes are Made
Next articleFive-Day Extravaganza for Vintage Lovers
Ludwick Mashatola is an Account Executive at CYG-Tech Creative Agency, where he leads on strategic marketing, communications, sales and content Manager for a wide range of cygtech advertisers/clients. Ludwick brings strong communication, sales and marketing skills to © Cyg Tech team. He previously served as a Purchasing and Marketing executive for Bamokgotsi Fruits & Veg, where he brought on board clients such as Spar, Fish & Chips, Boxer Super Store and Pick ‘n Pay.

LEAVE A REPLY